Occupational Health and Safety Policy

Our occupational health and safety policy

Part 1 – Statement of intent

Think! Don’t learn safety by accident Glendale – your safety is our business

Top management shall define and authorise the organisation’s Occupational Health & Safety policy (OH&S) and ensure that within the defined scope of its OH&S management system it:

  • Is appropriate to the nature and scale of the organisation’s OH&S risks;
  • Includes a commitment to prevention of injury and ill health and continual improvement in OH&S management and OH&S performance;
  • Includes a commitment to at least comply with applicable legal requirements and with other requirements to which the organisation subscribes that relate to its OH&S hazards;
  • Provides the framework for setting and reviewing OH&S objectives;
  • Is documented, implemented and maintained;
  • Is communicated to all persons working under the control of the organisation with the intent that they are made aware of their individual OH&S obligations;
  • Is available to interested parties; and
  • Is reviewed periodically to ensure that it remains relevant and appropriate to the organisation.

Our intention for 2018 is:

  • To reduce the Total Accident Frequency Rate (TAFR) by 20% and reduce RIDDOR reportable injuries by 50%
  • Review Health and Safety statistical analysis against the national benchmark
  • Analyse all near miss data and act upon the findings
  • To analyse manager, depot, site monitoring returns in the prevention of injury and ill health
  • To effectively communicate and measure the implementation of all documentation
  • Ensure 100% compliance with this policy

This will be achieved by ensuring that:

  • All accident data is captured and our performance is measured against relevant industry standards
  • The Safety Action Plan (SAP) continues to be used, audited by a senior manager twice yearly
  • Through literature, verbal and electronic forms of communication, safety awareness will be clearly communicated to all employees. The use of recorded toolbox talks will continue to be emphasised
  • Near miss, data will be analysed and reviewed to improve working practices where applicable
  • Replace paper forms with electronic versions to improve reporting efficiency
  • The company training matrix is utilised and ensures that all employees have the Skills, Knowledge, Ability, Training and Experience (SKATE) for carrying out their role
  • With professional, external support undertake a fundamental review of documentation

PART 2 – Organisation and responsibilities

Everyone shall be responsible for implementing our Occupational Health and Safety Policy.

By this collective responsibility, there is a much greater likelihood of achieving our occupational health and safety targets for the year and ensuring that we all stay safe.

2.1 Duties of the Board of Directors

It is the role and responsibility of the Board of Directors of the Glendale Division to:

  • Review the OH&S Policy annually
  • Provide adequate resources, safety equipment and personnel to fully implement the OH&S Policy.

The Managing Director (MD):

  • Retains corporate responsibility for occupational health and safety, and
  • Has appointed a Director with responsibility for occupational health and Safety (Director of Health & Safety and Compliance) to oversee the implementation of the OH&S Policy across all of Glendale’s activities.

This Director with responsibility for Occupational Health and Safety shall:

  • Report on occupational health and safety performance to the Board of Directors;
  • Oversee the activities of the National Occupational Health and Safety Group;
  • Determine the membership of the National Occupational Health and Safety Group;
  • Set objectives and targets for occupational health and safety and monitor the achievements of these with the MD, and;
  • Nominate another Director to deputise during periods of absence;
  • Line manage the Head of Occupational Health and Safety and Compliance.

2.2 Duties of the Executive Directors (DEMs) and Regional Managing Directors

It is their role and responsibility to:

  • Agree and sign off an annual Safety Action Plan for each contract or site under their control by the end of January;
  • Ensure the implementation of the OH&S Policy across all company activities;
  • Monitor adherence to the OH&S Policy;
  • Ensure the full implementation and monitoring of the Safety Action Plan;
  • Discuss occupational health and safety performance;
  • Review the outcomes of all major accident investigations;
  • Make the case to the Board of Directors for the resources to fully implement the OH&S Policy;
  • To receive and review regular reports from the Director on the management of occupational health and safety within the Company;
  • To ensure all occupational health and safety training is carried out and budgeted accordingly within the company to ensure the Divisional targets are met;
  • Ensure the provision of safe conditions at work throughout their areas of responsibility, for employees, customers and visitors alike;
  • Ensure all employees, and others under their authority have access to and implement the occupational health and safety instructions and information that is provided;
  • Investigate occupational health, safety and welfare complaints relating to all staff and others under their authority and represent these people on health, safety and welfare issues;
  • Ensure that the Contract Safety Committee’s function properly;
  • Inform the delegated Director with responsibility for occupational health and safety on any occupational health and safety issue, and;
  • To identify and prevent bad practice through the “non-conformance” procedure and assist in implementing safe solutions and suitable, relevant training.

2.3 Head of Occupational Health and Safety and Compliance

  • Maintain an up to date knowledge of relevant occupational health and safety legislation and best practice;
  • Provide updates on a monthly basis on all new or amended occupational health and safety legislation and communicate to all Glendale staff;
  • Provide monthly occupational health and safety reports to the Glendale board and 4 times per year for the National Occupational Health and Safety Group;
  • Lead in creating and maintaining a positive occupational health and safety culture;
  • Chair the National Occupational Health and Safety Group;
  • Monitor Glendale’s compliance with the organisation’s OH&S Policy and procedures and formally advise managers and directors on areas of non-compliance;
  • Manage the division’s 9001 quality management and 18001 systems (where the occupational health & safety systems are embedded);
  • Develop and maintain a programme of continuous review and improvement of Glendale’s occupational health and safety management systems;
  • Develop and maintain records of all occupational health & safety and compliance training in conjunction with HR and operational teams;
  • Liaise with HR and operational teams to maintain records of any occupational health-related issues associated with Glendale’s operations;
  • Establish, audit, monitor and maintain arrangements and guidance to ensure Glendale complies with the legal requirements under all relevant legislation;
  • Ensure that all accidents and near misses are reported and investigated in accordance with Glendale’s policies;
  • Liaise and develop good working relationships with all Glendale’s departments and family companies in so far as occupational health & safety and compliance;
  • Liaise with external bodies such as local authorities DNO and specialist groups on occupational health and safety issues;
  • Responsible for the programme of internal monitoring and audit of all occupational health and safety and compliance obligations and providing associated compliance reports;
  • Ensure procedures are in place associated with all Glendale’s legal and other obligations including fire safety, building, structures, building accessibility, mechanical and electrical building engineering services, welfare etc.

2.4 The National Occupational Health and Safety Group

The Director of Occupational Health & Safety and Compliance shall convene and maintain a National Occupational Health and Safety Group; it is the role and responsibility of this group to ensure that:

  • The OH&S Policy is reviewed when appropriate (at least annually) and that any necessary amendments are made and presented to the Board for approval;
  • The Board is kept up to date with relevant legislation;
  • Information on the management of occupational health and safety is presented to the Board;
  • The Company is managing occupational health and safety in line with the policy;
  • Occupational health and safety advice is available to Glendale personnel;
  • Advice is available for Directors and Managers on skills, training and budgetary provision to ensure continued compliance with the OH&S Policy, and;
  • This Group meets a minimum of four times per annum.

2.5 Duties of Senior Managers

A Senior Manager’s role is to:

  • Be actively involved in the preparation of an agreed annual Safety Action Plan for each contract or site under their control by the end of January each year;
  • Review and monitor those Safety Action Plans on a monthly basis;
  • Ensure the provision of safe conditions at work for employees and non-employees within their control, and to ensure that all visitors within their control are properly supervised at all times;
  • Ensure that all employees within their control understand and implement the terms of the OH&S Policy and that all employees are given, or have reasonable access to, a copy;
  • Ensure all employees and others within their control have access to and implement the occupational health and safety instructions and information that is provided, such as the Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) and Glendale Codes of Practice (GCoP);
  • Identify and implement appropriate occupational health and safety training in their areas of responsibility;
  • Ensure their employees are adequately represented on the respective Contract Safety Committees;
  • Support their Director and to stand in for them during periods of absence, and;
  • To identify and prevent bad practice through the “non-conformance” procedure and assist in implementing safe solutions and suitable, relevant training.

2.6 Engineering Team

The Engineering Team’s role is:

  • To ensure compliance with occupational health and safety regulations in respect of machinery use, training requirements and asset management procedures;
  • To liaise with local managers and engineering team(s) to ensure that they undertake an agreed format of the annual audit of each operational site to ensure compliance with occupational health and safety legislation and company; procedures.
  • Ensure that each presents a report on the findings to the local and senior management;
  • Be aware of site Safety Action Plans, assist in their implementation where required and monitor adherence to individual site requirements;
  • To identify and prevent bad practice through the “non-conformance” procedure and assist in implementing safe solutions and suitable, relevant training;
  • At all times, ensure equipment is operated in line with manufacturers recommendations, by those competent to do so and in accordance with the regulations laid down in the “Provision and use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998”;
  • To ensure that all portable electrical appliances are tested annually (PAT) and records kept, and;
  • Provide guidance, and where necessary, deliver suitable training to ensure equipment is operated in a safe manner so as not to pose a danger to the operator and/or those affected by the work they are undertaking.

2.7 Duties of Managers

A Manager’s role is to:

  • Prepare an agreed Safety Action Plan annually by the end of January with the assistance of their Senior Manager;
  • Take responsibility for providing safe conditions at work for employees and non-employees within their control, and ensure that all visitors under their control are properly supervised at all times;
  • Ensure that all employees within their control understand and implement the terms of the OH&S Policy and that all employees are given, or have reasonable access to, a copy;
  • Be familiar with all relevant occupational health and safety legislation and see that all registers, records and reports required are completed and that forms and documents are available;
  • Ensure that any duties delegated are only delegated to competent persons and shall monitor the situation in order to ensure that those duties are carried out;
  • Take into account the human capabilities of employees as regards occupational health and safety when entrusting them with tasks, and to ensure that employees are provided with sufficient occupational health and safety training as follows:

a) For new starters, existing employees and transferees
b) On being exposed to new or increased risks because of their transfer or change in responsibilities
c) On the introduction of new work equipment or a change in use of existing work equipment
d) On the introduction of new technology
e) On the introduction of a new system of work or a change respecting an existing system
f) Monitor and record the work of operatives under their control and remedy any malpractice observed or brought to their attention by any other means
g) Ensure that at least one member of the workforce is nominated as a Workforce Safety Representative or Representative of Employee safety at each depot or major work site
h) Discuss with their Occupational Health and Safety Advisor reports and recommendations from employees regarding health, safety and welfare matters
i) Ensure that an adequate level of delegated authority for occupational health and safety is given to a competent person during periods of absence, and
j) Ensure that all risk assessments and safe systems of work are in place for each operation as appropriate and that they are annually reviewed and all staff are trained on them (see section 3.1 of this Policy).

2.8 Regional Occupational Health and Safety Advisors (ROHSA)

The Regional Occupational Health and Safety Advisor’s role is to:

  • Be actively involved in the preparation of the annual Safety Action Plan for each contract or site in their areas of responsibility by end January;
  • Work with Directors and Managers to monitor the implementation of the Safety Action Plan;
  • Work with Directors and Managers to monitor the implementation of the OH&S Policy;
  • Receive the minutes of each Contract Safety Committee and respond to any matters arising as required;
  • Receive and collate accident data monthly from each contract and produce reports as per the agreed Safety Action;
  • Plans for the Occupational National Health and Safety Group, and;
  • Identify and prevent bad practice through the “non-conformance” procedure and assist in implementing safe solutions and suitable, relevant training.

2.9 Duties of Supervisors (includes Team Leader, Leading Chargehand and Chargehand)

A Supervisor’s role is to:

  • Be aware of their Safety Action Plan and to help to implement and support it at all times;
  • Ensure that all employees within their control understand and apply the OH&S Policy;
  • Enable first aid equipment to be maintained and ensure that first aid is made available in all cases of accidents without delay;
  • Ensure that all operatives within their control are properly trained and supervised for the tasks they perform;
  • Maintain a safe and tidy working area, and;
  • Report near misses and any non-conformance;
  • Review generic risk assessments for that task and/or complete Site Specific Risk Assessment and communicate to all team members (grounds);
  • Ensure a Site Specific Risk Assessment is completed. Involve all team members and each member of the team has signed the Site Specific Risk Assessment in agreement and understanding of the content (Arboriculture);
  • Ensure non-approved equipment is not being used onsite and all relevant equipment has been LOLER inspected and tested.

2.10 Duties of the Workforce Safety Representative and/or Representative of Employee Safety

A Safety Representative’s role is to:

  • To assist in the delivery and implementation of the agreed Safety Action Plan;
  • Provide an effective communication channel between the workforce and management;
  • To act as an initial point of contact for advice on occupational health and safety matters for the people they represent;
  • To consult as appropriate with the people they represent on any new documents in the OH&S Policy and other occupational health and safety information;
  • Assist in the investigation of accidents, if required, identify potential hazards and represent employees’ issues (see the Incident and Accident Reporting and Investigation SOP);
  • Inspect the workplace to check on safety standards, hazards and risks
  • Refer appropriate enquiries to the Occupational Health and Safety Advisor and report all findings to the management in writing;
  • Represent the workforce on the Contract Safety Committee, and;
  • Support their Manager in implementing the OH&S Policy.

2.11 Duties of All Employees

The 10 Golden Rules of Occupational Health and Safety (as detailed in the Appendix below) shall help all employees to meet their duties under the OH&S Policy.

In addition to the above, the employee’s role is to:

  • Be aware of their contract’s Safety Action Plan and to comply with it at all times;
  • Be aware of the OH&S Policy and to comply with it at all times;
  • Take care of their own occupational health and safety and to take equal care of others who may be affected by their work activities;
  • Act in a responsible manner and not to take part in any horseplay or practical jokes which might endanger occupational health and safety;
  • Co-operate with management in all matters of occupational health and safety;
  • Use all Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and safety equipment as and when necessary and not to interfere with or misuse equipment;
  • Report any matters relating to existing practices or procedures that might give rise to risks to the occupational health and safety of any persons;
  • Suggest improvements to existing practices which might improve health and safety, and;
  • Report any accidents or dangerous occurrences immediately to their line manager.

PART 3 – The arrangements

Everyone shall be responsible for making these arrangements work, the actions required of us all shall be identified in the Safety Action Plan.

By this collective responsibility, there is a much greater likelihood of achieving our Occupational Health and Safety targets for the year.

Glendale is committed to the prevention of injury and ill health through the compliance and adherence to the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and associated legislation.

3.1 Risk Assessment and Safe Systems of Work

Glendale endeavours to ensure a safe working environment for our employees, other people who may be working for us, for our visitors and for the general public. One process that we use to help meet that aim is to perform a Risk Assessment, a formal and structured process that seeks to:

  • Assess the hazards and risks that may arise from the work, and;
  • Identify and implement control measures to reduce those hazards and risks as far as possible.

A Safe System of Work may follow from the Risk Assessment process, the Safe System of Work may be recorded in a written statement with supporting illustrations or diagrams, or the Safe System of Work may be discussed amongst the work team.

It is critically important that, regardless of format, any Safe System of Work is shared amongst the team that is going to undertake the work, and that each member of that team understands their role in the delivery of that Safe System.

The Risk Assessment and Safe Systems of Work SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

3.2 Occupational Health and Safety Monitoring, Inspection, Audit and Review

In order to fully comply with the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, we must be able to prove that we actively manage risks in the workplace in order to ensure we can provide a safe place of work for our employees. Recorded monitoring is a method of ensuring that we meet our obligations in terms of the management of health and safety.

The purpose of the monitoring system is to provide routine information about our occupational health and safety performance for management review without having to rely on information following an incident or waiting for something to go wrong.

Monitoring is intended to identify where agreed standards or specified objectives are not met. Once identified appropriate action must be taken in order to ensure that the likelihood of accidents/incidents happening is minimised.

The Occupational Health and Safety Monitoring, Inspection, Audit and Review SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

3.3 Incident, Accident and Near Miss Reporting and Investigation

Clear guidance, information and instructions are provided in the Incident and Accident Reporting and Investigation SOP, which shall be the adopted arrangement for dealing with any type of incident or accident that occurs as a result of our undertakings, including any or all of the following:

  • Fatality (RIDDOR);
  • Specified injury (RIDDOR);
  • Seven days and over lost time injury (RIDDOR);
  • Over 3-day injury;
  • Minor injury;
  • Incidents resulting in accidental damage to equipment or property, and Near misses;
  • Safety Observations;
  • Dangerous Occurrences (RIDDOR)

An accident has been defined by the HSE as an unplanned or uncontrolled event that results in injury or ill-health of people, or damage or loss to property, plant, materials or the environment or a loss of a business opportunity.

A near miss is defined as an unplanned or uncontrolled event that could have resulted in injury or ill-health of people, or damage or loss to property, plant, materials or the environment or a loss of a business opportunity.

A safety observation is defined as a set of conditions or circumstances not directly linked to the work activity that has the potential to cause injury or ill health.

3.4 Non-conformance

The Non-conformance SOP addresses the grey areas that may arise in the management of health and safety, including those issues raised at machinery spot checks and during formal audits. The procedure uses a three-level system similar to that used by HM Inspectors of Health and Safety and is aimed at identifying problems and delegating responsibility for their rectification.

3.5 Training

Training is an essential tool in ensuring that staff are both competent to complete any task and also aware of the significant risks associated with the work to be done.

Company standard induction training shall be given to all employees at least annually, which must include:

  • Human Focus on-line H&S Induction. Additional modules completed in the set timescale as dictated by position and responsibilities;
  • The requirements of the Safety Action Plan;
  • OH&S Policy awareness, including the compliance with the Glendale SOPs and other supporting documents, whether existing or new;
  • Machinery, site and task-specific training, and;
  • Emergency procedures associated with their place of work;
  • A contract-wide training “needs analysis” must be undertaken by the Manager and a suitable training plan agreed, as part of the Safety Action Plan, and implemented with the assistance of their Senior Manager;
  • As part of the planning of training, it is essential that all necessary resources and time is given to be able to deliver effective training to the staff who require it.

3.6 Personal Protective Equipment

Glendale shall provide the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for the task as defined by the Risk Assessment and Safe Systems of Work (see 3.1 Risk Assessment and Safe Systems of Work above). The Personal Protective Equipment SOP shall be the adopted arrangement for the issue and inspection of PPE.

3.7 Manual Handling

Every employee shall receive annual training in correct manual handling techniques.  The company approved Manual Handling Training Package will be the adopted arrangement, in addition to that contained within the Human Focus induction, where necessary.

The Manual Handling SOP shall be the adopted arrangement for the assessment of Manual Handling tasks.

3.8 Information and Consultation

Every operative shall receive training in the content of the Safety Action Plan and the OH&S Policy and any supporting instructions. In this respect, it is a condition of the employees’ contract that they comply and cooperate with the letter and spirit of the company’s OH&S Policy and supporting instructions.

Glendale recognises that promoting effective consultation with the employees on occupational health and safety matters plays a large part in developing a safety culture within the business.

The Contract Safety Committee fulfils the requirements of the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 and The Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977. Each Contract shall hold four Safety Committee meetings per year at times in accordance with the published timetable; copies of the minutes are to be sent to the Regional Occupational Health and Safety Advisor.

Each site will have a Safety Committee made up of workforce representatives and chaired by the Manager. The membership of the Safety Committee shall include Supervisor(s), Team Leader(s), Chargehand(s), and Workforce Safety Representative(s)/Representative(s) of Employee Safety, the exact composition may be varied to suit the size of a particular contract as advised by the Occupational Health and Safety Advisor. The staff they are to represent shall select the individuals or, in the case of trade union representation, the Manager is notified of the
trade union representative.

3.9 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

Once the Manager has selected the most appropriate product, formulation or material for a particular task using the Approved Pesticides List and the Approved Substances list on ‘E5 POP’, as necessary, then a COSHH Assessment must be undertaken and the appropriate Manufacturer’s Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) obtained.

All substances that we use or that arise during our activity must be assessed. The COSHH material provided in the Occupational Health and Safety section of the Quality Management System includes generic assessments for categories of a wide range of popular products, such as:

  • Pesticides;
  • Non-pesticide horticultural products;
  • Oils, fuels and lubricants;
  • Grave related items, and;
  • Miscellaneous items (such as bleach or disinfectant).

In addition to products or formulations that may be applied to treat a particular problem the COSHH Assessments also include substances that arise from our actions that may be hazardous to health.

A contract specific COSHH file, containing the entire information specific to the hazardous substances at the specific site or contract must be created and maintained.

The Company will from time to time appoint one or more approved COSHH assessors. No new substances, i.e. those other than on the approved list must be brought onto Glendale sites without the written approval of the COSHH assessor.

3.10 Plant, Machinery and Equipment

To comply with our duties under the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 we will take every measure to ensure that all new equipment purchased:

  • Complies with the latest occupational health and safety regulations;
  • Is fit for purpose, and;
  • Poses no unnecessary risk to those operating it.

Specific arrangements for the safe use of the equipment are contained within the Safe Systems of Work (see section 3.1 Risk Assessment and Safe Systems of Work). Over and above this, all Managers must:

  • Take all measures to ensure that equipment is operated in situations applicable to its construction, by considering working conditions, operational hazards and climatic variations;
  • Take all measures to ensure that those operating machinery have been provided with adequate instruction, training and information applicable to the equipment and/or task they are undertaking;
  • Ensure that equipment is properly maintained, serviced and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and that this information is recorded;
  • Take all measures to ensure that machine guards are securely fitted and are in good order so as to afford maximum protection to those operating and those affected by the operation of the machine;
  • Take all measures to ensure that the safety systems and stop controls are fully operational so as to afford maximum protection to those operating and those affected by the operation of the machine;
  • Ensure that equipment which poses a significant risk has been inspected as per the requirements of the regulations, this will include (but is not restricted to):
    • Portable electrical appliances (the Electricity at Work SOP is to be the adopted arrangement),
    • Pressure vessels and
    • Lifting equipment (for the Arborists’ climbing equipment the Glendale Countryside LOLER (Lifting Operations Lifting Equipment Regs) Procedure in the Occupational Health and Safety section of the Quality Management System is to be the adopted arrangement)
  • Ensure that all employees within their control fully implement the Driving Company Vehicles SOP/GCoP and the Company Vehicle Drivers Handbook;
  • Ensure that all means are taken to safely store and transport fuel. The Safe Storage and Transportation of Fuel SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

Heavy Goods Vehicles

  • In order to fully comply with the requirements of the Ministry of Transport’s Traffic Commissioners and the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency, we must be able to prove that we actively manage our HGV fleet in accordance with the current rules and regulations as laid down by the aforementioned enforcing bodies;
  • The purpose of the Heavy Goods Vehicle Management SOP is to provide Managers with simple to follow guidelines for the compliant management of heavy goods vehicles at their specific operating sites;
  • Monitoring is intended to identify where agreed standards or specified objectives are not met. Once identified appropriate action must be taken in order to ensure that the likelihood of accidents/incidents happening is minimised;
  • The Heavy Goods Vehicle Management SOP is to be the adopted management system for our HGV fleet.

Hired Equipment

  • All hired equipment, plant and vehicles shall be sourced from nominated, assessed companies in accordance with company purchasing procedures, see the Systems Manual section of the Quality Management System and must be supplied complete with a copy of the Operators’ Manual;
  • It is the responsibility of every Manager or his nominated competent person to ensure the integral safety of all work equipment either borrowed or hired. The Manager must also ensure that any hired equipment is operated and maintained in accordance with the procedures laid down in section 3.10 above.

Acquired Plant and Equipment

  • The acquisition of plant and equipment from past users occurs periodically as a result of a contractual agreement, under which Glendale takes over an existing workforce under the TUPE regulations, complete with their accompanying work equipment;
  • It is the policy of Glendale to carry out inspections on any offered plant and equipment before purchase or acceptance. The nominated competent person shall carry out the inspection.

3.11 Health and Welfare

Glendale is committed to protecting the health, safety and welfare of our staff and of the visitors to our sites and premises.

Smoking

  • Glendale has a policy on smoking in the workplace that will be fully implemented at all sites and workplaces under our control.
  • The current Smoking Policy can be found in the Occupational Health and Safety section of the Quality Management System.

Control of Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS)

  • Glendale will meet its legal requirements under the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 through the adoption of purchasing arrangements under which operator comfort is a material factor underpinning any purchasing decision and the Control of Vibration Policy;
  • The Control of Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

Display Screen Equipment (DSE)

Glendale will meet its legal requirements under The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 as amended, and more generally by the Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, which place a general duty upon employers to provide safe and comfortable workstations for all staff. The Display Screen Equipment SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

Noise

  • Glendale will meet its legal requirements under the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 through the adoption of purchasing arrangements under which operator comfort is a material factor underpinning any purchasing decision;
  • All staff who are likely to be affected by the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 will be screed initially, after one year of this date and in three-year intervals thereafter. Any issues raised during the screening process will be referred to occupational health sources locally;
  • Where PPE is required to offer individual staff protection against the risk posed by noise then the Personal Protective Equipment SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

Notifiable diseases

Glendale will meet its legal requirements with respect to notifiable diseases under the relevant legislation and regulation, for such as the control and recording of Legionella, Tetanus, Weils Disease and Lyme disease.

3.12 Emergency Action

First Aid

  • Throughout Glendale, the need for first aid provision varies according to the activity being undertaken and the Company’s assessment of risk under the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.
  • The requirements of the Glendale First Aid Risk Assessment shall be referred to in the Safety Action Plan and shall be the adopted arrangement.

Fire Risk

a) Glendale will meet its legal requirements with respect to The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order, 2005 by conducting a formal Fire Risk Assessment for each Glendale site.

The assessment will consider a variety of hazards, including:

Sources of heat or ignition

  • Significant combustible materials, and
  • People especially at risk.

b) The Fire Risk Assessment shall indicate a Fire Risk Rating which in turn shall state:

  • Suitable arrangements for fire detection and warning
  • The fire fighting equipment required
  • The means of escape, and
  • Emergency escape procedures.

c) The Fire Manual, held at all Glendale sites, shall be the adopted arrangement and incorporates the Fire Safety in Glendale Premises SOP.

3.13 Food Safety Management

Glendale’s principal objectives under the provisions of the Food Safety Act 1990 and Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 are:

a) To comply with the law
b) To protect the consumer, and
c) To provide safe food.

In order to meet those objectives, the seven Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles have been incorporated by the Food Standards Agency into a Food Safety Management System and published as Safer Food, Better Business which will be the process adopted by Glendale.

The Parkwood Group Director of Catering has overall responsibility for the management of food safety in the Company.

3.14 Safety Notices and Signs

Managers are responsible for making provision for the required safety notices and signs at the contract or site, (including any satellite depots), the work site and on work equipment, and for ensuring they are appropriate to the needs of all staff, visitors and others in the course of the work being undertaken.

The HSE Safety at Work Information Notice (H&S law poster) must be displayed at every depot or office and the relevant local information on the poster must be completed and maintained as current and accurate.

The Contract Safety Signage SOP shall be the adopted arrangement.

3.15 The Management of Visitors and Customers

Glendale owes a duty of care to those who visit our premises.

The procedure for the Management of Visitors can be found in the Systems Manual section of the Quality Management System.  This shall be the adopted arrangement, subject to local review and adoption as a Contract Specific Procedure (see the Quality Management System).

3.16 Subcontractors

The adopted arrangement for the identification, selection, payment, and review of consultants, contractors or subcontractors to work under our direction is to be the Subcontractors SOP, which details the assessment procedures to be followed and the individuals responsible.

3.17 Welfare Facilities at Work

Under the Safety Action Plan it shall be the duty of the Manager at each site to ensure, where reasonably practicable, the provision of adequate and appropriate welfare facilities, suitably maintained, for all staff under their control whilst they are at work.

Where individuals or teams are working for prolonged periods in remote areas, without transport, adequate portable welfare facilities shall be made available as appropriate.

Because of the wide geographical area covered by many contracts, it is expected that staff shall, from time to time, make use of public amenities, which shall be left in a clean and tidy condition.

3.18 Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM) put specific duties on clients, contractors and designers to co-ordinate and to manage occupational health and safety on construction sites.

A project becomes notifiable to the HSE if the construction phase is likely to involve more than:

a) 30 days on site, or
b) 500 person days on site.

Please note that ALL construction projects are now subject to CDM (2015) Regulations whether notifiable or not

If the project is notifiable to the HSE then the client must appoint a CDM Co-ordinator as soon as practical after initial design work has been done. There are other specific duties imposed by CDM on the client, contractor and designer, and all parties must be aware of these requirements.

3.19 Working at Heights (including Tree Works)

Pursuant to the Work at Height Regulations, 2005, all work at height (including tree works) will be adequately planned, organised, supervised and carried out in as safe a manner as is practicable, by competent persons in each case, consistent with the hierarchical approach specified in the regulations. Prior to any work at height, a risk assessment will be undertaken by the Contract Manager (or an appropriately trained and competent person) to determine the most suitable safe means of access, the work equipment which is appropriate (which will be adequately inspected and maintained) and to ensure that adequate emergency procedures, including aerial rescue provision, are in place. The competent person will be responsible for carrying out work at height risk assessments. Detailed arrangements for managing work at height (including tree works) are contained in a separate Working at Heights Policy.

Appendix:

The 10 Golden Rules of Occupational Health and Safety

1. Understand your occupational health and safety responsibilities
2. Ask your Supervisor’s or Manager’s advice if you are unsure
3. Never undertake unauthorised tasks or operations
4. Ensure the safety of your workmates and members of the public
5. Wear and use correctly all the PPE and safety equipment that has been provided
6. It’s up to you to report defects, faults, hazards, near misses and accidents
7. Ensure that your work equipment is safe before use
8. Know who your workforce representative is and their role
9. Never take part in horseplay or practical jokes at work
10. Suggest improvements in occupational health and safety at work