Glendale’s commitment to tackling skills shortages and unemployment has been reflected in the growth of the number of staff undergoing apprenticeships within the business.

Apprentices make up 8.5 percent of the national green service provider’s current workforce, compared to 5.8 percent in 2016. It’s a figure the firm is continually working to increase as part of its membership of The 5% Club.

The 5% Club is designed to get the UK’s public and private sector companies to commit to having five percent of its total workforce as apprentices, sponsored students or graduates within five years.

Glendale is also reminding businesses of the benefits of apprentices during National Apprenticeship Week, which runs from 5 - 9 March. This year’s theme is ‘Apprenticeships Work.’

The company recently collected an accolade for its apprenticeship scheme from industry magazine Pro Landscaper’s Business Awards.

Last year Glendale was also involved in designing a new 12-month apprenticeship in arboriculture in partnership with Cornwall College, with the aim of increasing the quality of training available in the industry.

Sue McGrath, group HR director at Glendale, said: We are proud to be a part of The 5% Club, it’s an initiative that can really make a difference to the lives of people looking to gain new skills and improve their prospects. The fact that the number of apprentices within the company is continuing to grow is a reflection of our commitment in this area.

Our apprentices are invaluable to the business and its imperative that we and other employers provide individuals with ample opportunities for practical training and the qualifications required to build careers.

“National Apprenticeship Week is the perfect time to shine the spotlight on the many benefits apprenticeships offer to individuals and organisations, while encouraging more people to get involved and see where it could take them.

“We also need to remind people that apprenticeships are not just limited to younger people; by taking on apprentices in a range of ages, employers can benefit from the experience and transferable skills gained from previous roles.